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M64 Blackeye
M65
M66
M74
M81 Bode
  M81 - M82.jpg -  M82     NGC3934       and       M81     NGC3031   Galaxy Pair   ST-8XME camera     FSQ-106EDX III scope @ 530mm  (f/5)     AP900 mount 5 hour total exposure     LRGB 75:75:75:75 subs 5:5:5:5 binned 1:2:2:2     (3.49" per pixel unbinned)   Guiding with ST-402XME camera on 2.8" Pronto scope @ 475mm (f/6.8)   M81, Bode’s Galaxy, is the spiral galaxy on the right side of this image while M82, the Cigar Galaxy, is the edge on starburst galaxy on the left side. M81 contains a supermassive blackhole of about 70M solar masses. Both are about 12 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major making them among our nearest galactic neighbors outside the Local Group. They are currently separated by about 130,000 light-years and are in the process of colliding. M82 has undergone at least one previous tidal encounter with M81 resulting in a large amount of gas being funneled into the galaxy’s core triggering a large amount of star formation making it the brightest galaxy visible to us in the infrared part of the spectrum.   
Markarian Chain
M99 St Katherines Wheel
M100
M101 Pinwheel
M105

M82     NGC3934     and     M81     NGC3031
Galaxy Pair

ST-8XME camera     FSQ-106EDX III scope @ 530mm (f/5)     AP900 mount
5 hour total exposure     LRGB 75:75:75:75 subs 5:5:5:5 binned 1:2:2:2     (3.49" per pixel unbinned)
Guiding with ST-402XME camera on 2.8" Pronto scope @ 475mm (f/6.8)

M81, Bode’s Galaxy, is the spiral galaxy on the right side of this image while M82, the Cigar Galaxy, is the edge on starburst galaxy on the left side. M81 contains a supermassive blackhole of about 70M solar masses. Both are about 12 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major making them among our nearest galactic neighbors outside the Local Group. They are currently separated by about 130,000 light-years and are in the process of colliding. M82 has undergone at least one previous tidal encounter with M81 resulting in a large amount of gas being funneled into the galaxy’s core triggering a large amount of star formation making it the brightest galaxy visible to us in the infrared part of the spectrum.

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