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M81 Bode
M81 - M82
Markarian Chain
M99 St Katherines Wheel
M100
  M101 Pinwheel.jpg -  M101      NGC5457      Pinwheel Galaxy   distance: 27 Mly     actual size: 170,000 ly     apparent size: 29'     image size: 30'x30'  FLI PL-16803 camera     12.5" Planewave scope @ 2500mm  (f/8)     AP900 mount 13.3 hour total exposure     LRGB 290:180:170:160 subs 10:10:10:10 binned 1:2:2:2     (0.73" per pixel unbinned)   MMOAG with ST402-ME camera guiding    Note:  some catalogues assign M102, as well as M101, to NGC5457. Charles Messier added M102 to his famious list based on observations by his assistant, Pierre Mechain. Mechain, later claimed that M102 did not exist and was simply a re-observation of M101. Current catalogues sometimes associate M102 with NGC5866.This galaxy appears to closely match both the object description  (by Pierre Méchain) in the printed version of the Messier Catalog of 1781, and the object position given by Charles Messier in hand-written notes on his personal list of the Messier Catalogue. There is no universally accepted position.   
M105
M106
M109
ngc 0891
ngc 0925

M101     NGC5457     Pinwheel Galaxy

distance: 27 Mly     actual size: 170,000 ly     apparent size: 29'     image size: 30'x30'

FLI PL-16803 camera     12.5" Planewave scope @ 2500mm (f/8)     AP900 mount
13.3 hour total exposure     LRGB 290:180:170:160 subs 10:10:10:10 binned 1:2:2:2     (0.73" per pixel unbinned)
MMOAG with ST402-ME camera guiding

Note: some catalogues assign M102, as well as M101, to NGC5457. Charles Messier added M102 to his famious list based on observations by his assistant, Pierre Mechain. Mechain, later claimed that M102 did not exist and was simply a re-observation of M101. Current catalogues sometimes associate M102 with NGC5866. This galaxy appears to closely match both the object description (by Pierre Méchain) in the printed version of the Messier Catalog of 1781, and the object position given by Charles Messier in hand-written notes on his personal list of the Messier Catalogue. There is no universally accepted position.

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