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ngc 7635 Bubble
Cave Nebula
SH2-112
SH2-142
SuperNova
  M01 Crab.jpg -  M1      NGC1954      SN1054     Crab Nebula    Supernova Remnant with Pulsar   distance: 6,500 ly     actual size: 13 ly     apparent size: 7'x5'     image size: 15'x15'  FLI PL-16803 camera     12.5" Planewave scope @ 2500mm  (f/8)     AP900 mount 11.8 hour total exposure     HLRGB 210:190:100:100:110 subs 10:10:10:10:10 binned 1:1:2:2:2     (0.73" per pixel unbinned)   MMOAG with ST402-ME camera guiding   The Crab Nebula was formed when a star, about 10 times the mass of the Sun, exploded.It was observed by Chinese and Arab astronomers in 1054 AD and was probably brighter than anything in the night sky other than the Moon. The event, known as a type II supernova, occurs when a massive star runs out of sufficient fuel to power nuclear fusion letting gravity suddenly collapse the star in on itself resulting in an extremely strong stellar explosion. At a distance of about 7,000 ly (41,000,000,000,000,000 miles) ,the nebula is about 13 ly in diameter expanding at a rate of about 3 million MPH. A remnant of the original star can be seen at the center of the nebula  (it's the dimmer of the star pair in the center of of photo) .This magnitude 17.7 neutron star, about 13 miles in diameter, known as a pulsar, rotates 33 times per second. It is one of the brightest gamma ray objects in the sky.The nebula and central star emit 75,000 times more energy than the Sun. The last supernova within the Milky Way was seen in 1604 although 1 or 2 are expected each century.   
M51 with supernova
M82 with supernova
M95 with supernova
Veil
ngc 6960 Western Veil

M1     NGC1954     SN1054     Crab Nebula
Supernova Remnant with Pulsar

distance: 6,500 ly     actual size: 13 ly     apparent size: 7'x5'     image size: 15'x15'

FLI PL-16803 camera     12.5" Planewave scope @ 2500mm (f/8)     AP900 mount
11.8 hour total exposure     HLRGB 210:190:100:100:110 subs 10:10:10:10:10 binned 1:1:2:2:2     (0.73" per pixel unbinned)
MMOAG with ST402-ME camera guiding

The Crab Nebula was formed when a star, about 10 times the mass of the Sun, exploded. It was observed by Chinese and Arab astronomers in 1054 AD and was probably brighter than anything in the night sky other than the Moon. The event, known as a type II supernova, occurs when a massive star runs out of sufficient fuel to power nuclear fusion letting gravity suddenly collapse the star in on itself resulting in an extremely strong stellar explosion. At a distance of about 7,000 ly (41,000,000,000,000,000 miles), the nebula is about 13 ly in diameter expanding at a rate of about 3 million MPH. A remnant of the original star can be seen at the center of the nebula (it's the dimmer of the star pair in the center of of photo). This magnitude 17.7 neutron star, about 13 miles in diameter, known as a pulsar, rotates 33 times per second. It is one of the brightest gamma ray objects in the sky. The nebula and central star emit 75,000 times more energy than the Sun. The last supernova within the Milky Way was seen in 1604 although 1 or 2 are expected each century.

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